Tuesday, 14 December 2010

Science-Art Scumble #6

Scumble:
"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly digest to highlight some of the posts I found most interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources. Sit back, have an espresso and enjoy.

Note: the Scumble may stumble some time over the next couple of weeks - my wife and I are expecting our first child, and I may take a break so I can stare at the baby.

Click here for earlier scumbles.

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What is Science-Art? , The Flying Trilobite.

Live not by visualization alone - Gene Expression

Historians discover letters and numbers in Mona Lisa's eyes, Yahoo7.  (Hat-tip to Sarah Kavassalis.)

Transparent Specimens, Deep Sea News.

Unpopular Science - NY Times, An Eye for Science.

Louis XIV - The science king - CultureLab.

Paracyclophus, Love in the Time of the Chasmosaurs.  Comic-hero dinosaurs!

Bubble and squeak 2010, A Distant Ugly Mountain.

Protesting global warming - one melting figure at a time, Hybrids of Art and Science.

Winners of the Evolution & Art Contest! , Charlie's Playhouse Blog

Creativity is Serious Business, Art Works: National Endowment for the Arts.

Growing up with art, Gurney Journey.

WIP Jaguar - Starting the Detail Work, Heather Ward Wildlife Art.

Science-Artist Feed grows to 100, The Flying Trilobite.

Parasitic Trilobites, The Episiarch.

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow
under Creative Commons Licence.

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Posts over 14 days old have their comments held in moderation - I've been getting an unusual amount of spam for a guy who paints trilobites. I'll release it lickety-split though.

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